For this author, creative endeavors have been sorely tested by motherhood. But also transformed, and in ways she wouldn’t have imagined – couldn’t have, without her life “rewritten” as it has been, by her children. So linger here, to read all things weaverly, writerly and motherly.

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Monday, April 2, 2012

B for brontosaurus


This is part of the April's A-Z challenge:

The brontosaurus. One of the largest animals to ever walk the planet. And of all dinosaurs, his mother's favorite.

"Because it can eat from the tops of trees," she'd said, when they'd been reading a favorite children's book; the dinosaurs are cut from felt, with button eyes and sequined tails.

In the book, the brontosaurus is eating from a tree of finely embroidered leaves. "It's like he has his head in the sky," she'd said. She'd always linger on that page. Touch the embroidered leaves as if they weren't a photo facsimile.

This was when he was still a toddler, but now that he was in second grade, he was reading actual factual dinosaur books. He didn't know how to break to his mother the news: that the brontosaurus actually had been more of a land grazer – more like a lawn mower, having used its long neck close to the ground, to reach across wide bushy terrains. It had been too encumbered by its own sheer weight to move freely through tree tops. To keep it's neck so upright, its head in the sky.

He especially didn't know how to break the news, as she stood at the sink doing the dishes. Because sometimes, while rinsing a dish, she would look out the window, upwards, past towering pines, and he understood then why she liked the brontosaurus best. Because she might actually imagine herself as one – her sights on the sky, rather than dishes, on the scrubbing burnt rice off the bottom of a pot.

Neither did he tell her about what he'd learned about his own favorite, the Triceratops. The one he liked best because it had those three horns. Disappointed, he'd learned that the horns were not for actual fighting. More to attract girls. And that the T-rex could actually eat him for lunch. The two long-gone dinosaurs had that in common; vegetarian eaters and essentially non-threatening. He adored everything about his mother, the way he could imagine her moving harmlessly through the trees. But he preferred to imagine himself as fierce. Even in his mother's own loving eyes, and he wasn't sure why.


19 comments:

mooderino said...

Sweet story.

Thanks for the comment on my post. Now following your blog.

mood
Moody Writing

Jenn said...

This was such a fun story!! I can tell I'm going to love your A-Z Challenges...I'm going to read this to my 6 year old and see what he thinks!

Cheers, Jenn
http://www.wine-n-chat.com

Paula Martin said...

Sweet story, I love his thoughts.

Stephanie said...

This is lovely. You have a way with words.

Kathy said...

I am kind of stupid about which dinosaur is which, but I sure loved your story.

Kathy
http://gigglingtruckerswife.blogspot.com/

Amy Morgan said...

So beautiful. My son (now 23) and I have quite a history of reading about dinosaurs. I will definitely share this with him.

Amy
http://amywritesnet.blogspot.com/

Theresa Milstein said...

Oh, my son went through such a dinosaur phase! For his fourth birthday, I bought sand and a big container + a big bag of plastic dinosaurs. Every kid got a little shovel and took a turn excavating. It was a big hit!

Nikki said...

Wow! I absolutely adored this post. This story was so lovely and well-written! Thank you for sharing it :)

I'm following you now, I can't wait to read your coming posts!

Nikki – inspire nordic

Debra Harris-Johnson said...

So that is what those 3 horns are about (: Very intersting. Thanks for visiting me today.
dreamweaver

Claudia Moser said...

Very nice!

November Rain - k~ said...

I loved this... one bridge of a moment between what the challenge requires, and into the mind of mother and child.

Beverly Diehl said...

Lovely and poignant. Not a fan of scrubbing burnt rice off the bottom of pots, either.

beachlover said...

This was a very sweet post and I did not know that Triceratops three horns were for attracting a mate! That rascal...

danneromero said...

very nice, sandra.

Jo said...

Nicely done, though I know nothing of these creatures, I feel like they were much less treacherous than we like to imagine.

Good story. ♥

Joyce Lansky said...

I don't know what it is about dinosaurs, but kids love them!


Catch My Words
http://joycelansky.blogspot.com/

Joyce Lansky said...

PS - B went up at 5 AM. That's odd that you didn't see it. C is scheduled for 1:31 in the afternoon tomorrow. Trying to combine with Wordless Wednesday. Keeping the regular schedule while blogging A-Z can be tough.

Rachel Morgan said...

Aw, I remember being fascinated by all the different dinosaurs when I was little! I did find JURASSIC PARK a truly terrifying movie though (yeah, I was easily scared as a child... I won't say whether I'm easily scared now!).

Melissa Bradley said...

I love this! The brontosaurus was always my fave dinosaur, too. :)

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